Giving

One woman’s mission to light up her town for Christmas

This Christmas, one American town is shining a little brighter – thanks to Victoria Coakley and her project to “light up” the west end of Louisville, Kentucky.

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Coakley told local news station WLKY that it is her mission to bring more decorations to West Louisville.

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“Instead of seeing the abandoned houses with cardboard on them and graffiti, I want them to see Christmas lights,” Coakley said.

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Since the beginning of December, Coakley has been collecting decorations and stringing them around the neighborhood with the help of volunteers. Coakley received enough to decorate about 100 homes.

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Coakley’s efforts to light up the this part of Louisville have been well received by the people of the neighborhood, who agree that this gives the town some much needed positivity.

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“It is all about the kids, just trying to give them some kind of inspiration,” Stallard, a local resident, said.

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As captioned in a Facebook post, the west end of Louisville doesn’t have many Christmas lights. Children deserve to see Christmas spirit, regardless of the neighborhood they live in.

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"It changes the atmosphere of everything. There's not really a lot of activity or positive things going on that you can visually see. So the lights are something that you can see," Coakley said.

Humans of New York ensure no one dines alone this Christmas

 

For the fourth year in a row, photojournalist project Humans of New York is doing its part to make sure everybody has a good Christmas, even if they may not have friends or family to celebrate with.

“Every holiday season we try to connect people in New York City who would like to share a holiday meal. Why? Because nothing is worse than being alone on Christmas or Hanukkah,” a post on Humans of New York’s Instagram reads.

The tradition, titled HONY for the Holidays, invites anyone with interest to send an email to HONY as a guest or a host; guests might have circumstances that force them to be alone this holiday season, and hosts might have extra room at the dinner table to feed a couple more mouths.

To facilitate good conversation over a hearty meal, HONY asks that guests and hosts share a little bit about themselves so that they can be aptly paired up. Practical concerns such as location and dietary restrictions are also factored in, and everyone is screened before matches are made.

Founder of Humans of New York Brandon Stanton understands the frustration of being on your own when everybody else in the world seems to be reuniting with loved ones. In an Instagram post two years ago when the initiative was being held for the second time, he recounted spending his first Christmas Eve in New York at a 24-hour diner, with no money to fly home.

Between colorful portraits of everyday New Yorkers and articulating their stories to millions of followers, Humans of New York continues to inspire with this wonderful project that seeks to promote solace and the spirit of giving back in a fast-paced city.

Turkeys not Tickets

Officers in Fort Worth, Texas, hand out turkeys instead of tickets in time for the holiday season!

Traffic officers in the town of Fort Worth, Texas, are changing things up a little: they’re handing out turkeys instead of tickets just in time for the holiday season. “Even though we do enforce traffic law and we do have some unpleasant decisions to make, we still are about the people,” said Officer Anthony Colter. Colter made five traffic stops on Wednesday, each time giving the driver a turkey to take home. 

Five teams of officers have been handing out Thanksgiving turkeys across the city to drivers, a welcome surprise for drivers who thought they were going to be pulled over and slapped with a hefty fine. The Thanksgiving turkeys were left over from a community project in which officers were bringing food to local residents.

 The act of kindness is spreading some much needed holiday cheer during the post-election season in America, where tensions are running high and citizens are feeling unheard.

“I’m pleased to see it, because there’s so much hate in this country right now,” one motorist said. “To see brotherly love, it’s very, very inspiring.”

Photo (and turkey) credits to Fort Worth Police Department